Wednesday, October 27, 2004

MY LETTER TO KERRY

Dear Senator Kerry,

I am writing today to tell you who will receive my vote for president and why.

I am very concerned about the President Bush’s foreign policies, his seeming eagerness to see war as the first option, his failure to plan things out fully, and the impact this has had on the United States’ reputation in the world. It is hard to be proud to be American when I turn on the news and see our soldiers abusing prisoners, and hostage after hostage being taken prisoner and executed in retaliation for our policies. I am concerned about an Administration that seems OK with using torture and setting aside international law.

So, I would welcome a change in the Oval Office. You seem to be up to the task. You take the threat of global terror seriously, but you are not so anxious to plunge us into war. You are willing to work with our traditional allies, and respect our tradition of concern for the rights of the criminally accused. You oppose the death penalty, which is a needlessly cruel practice in modern America. You were the president’s superior in all of the debates. If you were elected president, I could be prouder to be an American.

But I cannot vote for you.

Because, as you profess to agree, I believe that life begins at conception. And if there has been one thing you have been consistent on in your political career, it has been to deny the unborn any protection under the law, and to exploit them for medical research. You have pledged not to nominate Supreme Court nominees who do not see the Constitution guaranteeing a right to abortion, ensuring that legal abortion will remain the law of the land for another generation. You have the support of every radical pro-abortion group.

This is profoundly disappointing, especially since we share the Catholic faith. I do not agree with those who sought to deny you communion, but my conscience will not allow me to support a candidate with such utter disregard for the rights of the unborn. And it baffles me how someone who says he believes that life begins at conception could take very opportunity to shove the unborn aside. You say that you can’t impose this “article of faith” on those who don’t share that belief, but that strikes me as a convenient pose. If I believed that abusing my child was OK, would you hesitate to impose your moral view on me? I certainly hope not.

I understand that your political party has long standing ties to the abortion industry. But, as the Party’s nominee, you are the leader of your party, and you had the opportunity to change that. You could have sent the message that those who believe in the rights of the unborn are welcome in the party. You could have sworn off litmus tests for judicial appointees, and disentangled the party from the abortion lobby.

You did none of these things. You continued to be careful not to say anything that could conflict with the most radical pro-abortion groups. You have not only supported research that destroys embryos, you have hyped its promise unrealistically, and demagogued the president on this issue.

It is my great hope that my vote and the votes of others like me will be the reason that you are not elected president. Perhaps then, you and your party will have to honestly reconsider your tight alliance with the abortion lobby, and we can work together to work for all people both born an unborn. I look forward to that day. It is my hope that you do, too.

If you are elected, I will continue to pray for you with this awesome responsibility, and that you will change your mind and use your position to put protections in place for the unborn.

I am sorry that I cannot support you in your campaign. I will be voting for President Bush.
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