Monday, December 01, 2003

ON THE SAME SEX MARRIAGE LOT
Reading some of the arguments for same sex marriage, I get the feeling of a car salesman trying to sell me a car with no turn signals.

ME: That certainly is a nice car, but it doesn't have turn signals, which doesn't seem too safe to me.

SALESMAN: What do you mean? Do you think driving is all about signaling?? That's the most ridiculous thing I've ever heard! Driving is about going and stopping and turning, not about signaling! The very first cars didn't have turn signals, and people signalled with their hands, would you say those weren't valid cars? [Loud voice] This guy thinks driving is all about using turn signals!!

ME: I'm not saying that driving is all about signalling. I am saying that signalling is an important part of driving, and your car makes that impossible.

SALESMAN: Well, there's lots of drivers out on the road who don't use turn signals all the time. Why aren't you stopping them? Why don't you tell them they're not valid drivers? Seems like that's what you should be worrying about, instead of stopping people from enjoying this fabulous new car!

ME: Well, it seems to me that if you put a new car out there without turn signals, it will create an environment where people will be less inclined to use the signals they have, and that would make the situation worse.

SALESMAN: How can you be so paranoid? [Loud voice] This guy STILL thinks driving is all about signalling!

ME: I give up.


There's just so much strawman bashing out there.

We who oppose same sex marriage don't think that marriage is "all about procreation," but do believe that openness to procreation is a vital aspect to marriage. And while contraception, divorce and adultery in existing heterosexual marriages pull marriage away from its ideal, calling something marriage that is from the beginning explicitly and publicly closed to procreation is only going to make this worse, and is worth the effort to oppose it.

Believe me, I wish I could just say "whatever floats your boat" and move on, but the stakes are too high.
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